Archive: Sailing Lingo
Sailing Lingo: Irish Reef
| January 5, 2011

On Monday we asked, what does Irish Reef mean and where did the term originate? According to “Origins of Sea Terms” by John G. Rogers, Irish Reef is a method of shortening sail (sometimes in a hurry) on a gaff-rigged fore-and-after, by lowering the peak. Thanks to everyone who played along.

Sailing Lingo: Irish Reef
| January 3, 2011

Today’s challenge is: Irish Reef. Do you know what this term means and how it originated? Sailing Lingo aims to test your knowledge of the peculiar and sometimes indecipherable language of sailing. We pose a question and see who can answer it most accurately in the comments section of the post. Be sure to check […]

Sailing Lingo: Antipodean Day
| November 18, 2010

On Wednesday we asked, what does Antipodean Day mean and where did the term originate? According to “Origins of Sea Terms” by John G. Rogers, Antipodean Day is the day gained (or lost) crossing the International Dateline (approximately the 180th meridian) heading west. The word comes from the Greek hoi antipodes, roughly meaning opposite.

Sailing Lingo: Antipodean Day
| November 17, 2010

Today’s challenge is: Antipodean Day. Do you know what this term means and how it originated? Sailing Lingo aims to test your knowledge of the peculiar and sometimes indecipherable language of sailing. We pose a question and see who can answer it most accurately in the comments section of the post. Be sure to check […]

Sailing Lingo: Breeches Buoy
| October 22, 2010

On Thursday we asked, what does Breeches Buoy mean and where did the term originate? According to “Origins of Sea Terms” by John G. Rogers, a Breeches Buoy is a life-ring with a canvas seat that looks like a pair of breeches or pants. It is fitted with a harness by which it can be […]